SCBWI

Society of
Children's Book Writers
and Illustrators

WIK 18 Schedule

Saturday March 10, 2018
Conference Workshops

7:30 – 8:30   Registration * Morning Mingle * Bookstore

8:30 – 8:45   Welcome and Opening Announcements

8:45 –  9:00   Introduction of Guests and Keynote Speaker

9:00 – 9:45  Keynote with Linda Sue Park
Yours Truly: why passion matters   What’s the secret to writing an irresistible manuscript? Linda Sue Park will talk about how true passion is the key to every question you might have about writing. From choice of subject matter to aspects of craft, bringing passion to your project is what will make it stand out for your readers–including that agent or editor.

10:00- 10:45 AM  Breakout Session One: 

Christina Farley
Enter the Magical World of Hogwarts Publishing   Have you ever felt like the world of publishing is a lot like entering the magical world of Harry Potter? You must receive a special invitation via owl, stand on Platform 9 ¾ for entrance, and possess certain magical powers. But in reality, publishing is a feat that even Muggles like you can achieve! In this talk, attendees will gain tips to achieve those ‘magical writer abilities,’ learn the process to get an agent, and get an insider peek into the world of publishing.

Deborah Halverson
The Ultimate Checklist for Submitting to Editors10 Tests a Novel Must Pass to Prove It’s Really Ready for Submission to Editors   Too often, YA/MG manuscripts are submitted to editors before they are truly ready. And since you only get one chance with a particular editor, you can’t risk sending out a manuscript that’s not the best it can be. But how can you know when your manuscript is really ready? You think it is, but how can you know for sure? Learn ten actionable tests for knowing when a novel is really, truly ready to submit… along with ways to whip the manuscript into shape if it fails a single one of them.

Deborah Shine
The Role of the Independent Publisher   From Friends at School to the Jake series, why Star Bright has published books about diverse children for more than a quarter century.

Erica Silverman
Discussing and Dissecting Picture Books

Nicki Carmack
Basic Content overview:   What is bleed? RGB or CMYK? How does the gutter impact my artwork? This session will discuss many of the basic rules of production that will ensure illustrations are reproduced in the way the artist intended.

Matt Ringler
Create a Character: You Will Leave Here With a New One

Cathy Hall
Putting Yourself Out There   SCBWI provides lots of opportunities for members to share their expertise and experience, not to mention making a little money in the process. This workshop will take ideas all the way to proposals, with the tips and tools necessary to get a member seen, heard, and read in the SCBWI community and beyond!
The session will include three ways to get out there:
1. The SCBWI Bulletin (pitching an article, what makes an idea sell, brainstorming pitches, general tips for article-writing)
2. Conference Workshops (what conferences are available for workshops, brainstorming ideas, getting creative, selling yourself)
3. SCBWI Events (other events to get yourself out there)
4. General Tips and Tricks of the Trade (will be asking PALs for their best tips and tricks as well as some of my own)

John Cusick
PACING: Learn to write an un-put-downable novel by exploring what to cut, what to keep, and what order to put it in.

11:00- 11:45 AM  Breakout Session Two: 

Linda Sue Park
Scene: the building block of fiction   The scene is the basic unit of the novel. This session will provide an overview of how to use scene to develop and propel your story. Learn how thinking in scenes can be valuable at every stage: planning, writing, and revising.

Deborah Halverson
Up to the Minute Survey of Market Needs and Trends   An in-depth look at the state of the children’s book industry, from new imprints to what’s selling and what’s being acquired, what’s being wished for, what’s not so popular, and what’s showing signs of potential upswing. Understand what industry insiders see when they assess today’s marketplace, and what their submission inboxes and acquisitions look like so you’ll have a rich understanding of our unique corner of publishing and be able to better position the projects you’re working on.

Deborah Shine
Writing for a multilingual audience:   What works and doesn’t work in picture book manuscripts that will be published in more than one language. Children should not only be able to see themselves in print but also hear their native tongue when the books are read aloud., so Star Bright makes bilingual books available in 24 languages, including Haitian Creole, Vietnamese, and simple Chinese.

Janice Hardy
Creating Stronger Conflicts in Your Novel   At the heart of every story is conflict. It’s so central to good storytelling, that without it, you have no story. But despite its importance, it’s not always easy to find the conflict in an idea. In this workshop, you’ll examine what “conflict” really means and how to find the right conflict for your story. You’ll learn to identify the different types of conflict, how to use internal and external conflicts to plot, and how to tell if you need a character arc or not. You’ll also explore the most common reason for missing or weak conflict in a story, and hear tips on how to fix them.

Pat Cummings
Visual Storytelling for Author Illustrators:   Developing a story through illustrations. How a story can be developed through appealing imagery.

Matt Ringler
Lots of Plots: From the Beginning to the End (and Everything in Between)

John Cusick
STAYING SANE   Writer’s block, imposter-syndrome, the inner critic, isolation! Learn practical techniques for embracing the writers life without going stir-crazy.

Erica Silverman
Selecting the Right Agent for You

Noon to 1:00 PM – Lunch Break

1:00 – 1:45   Breakout Session Three

Irene Latham and Jim Baggett
Setting the Scene   
Join an author and archivist team as they share secrets to finding and using archival resources to create rich, authentic and accurate historical settings so that readers feel like they are living inside the pages of your book.

Deborah Halverson
The Read-Aloud Factor: Achieving Rhythm without Relying on Rhyme in Picture Books   Children’s book editors consider rhythmic language an essential factor in a satisfying picture book reading experience. Yet many of these same editors won’t accept submitted manuscripts written in rhyme because fluid, masterful rhyming is so difficult to accomplish. That means picture book writers must inject rhythm into their storytelling without relying on rhyme. This session teaches techniques to write a rhythmic, satisfying, fun-to-read-aloud picture book text without using rhyme.

Deborah Shine
The Role of the Independent Publisher:   From Friends at School to the Jake series, why Star Bright has published books about diverse children for more than a quarter century.

Erica Silverman
Discussing and Dissecting Picture Books

Pat Cummings
Killer Portfolios:   Assembling a portfolio with only the most effective, essential and evocative images to engage picture book editors, art directors and agents.

Jaimie Engle
Landing A Literary Agent: What To Expect and What Not To Expect   Finding a literary agent is a challenging process. In this workshop, Jaimie Engle takes you through the process from research to rewrites, query letters and synopsis. Q & A to follow, and attendees are encouraged to bring in their 1 page query letter to submit for group study.
• Writing a query letter that pops
• Tackling the dreaded synopsis with ease
• Secret places to find your Super Awesome Agent
• Questions to ask with the offer of representation
• Stats, behind the scenes, and other tricks you might not know

John Cusick
PACING:   Learn to write an un-put-downable novel by exploring what to cut, what to keep, and what order to put it in.

Matt Ringler
Create a Character: You Will Leave Here With a New One   

2:00 – 2:45   Breakout Session Four

Debbie Dadey
Five Steps to Worldbuilding   
With 13 series under her belt and over 42 million copies in print, children’s author Debbie Dadey has had great fun creating fun worlds both human and other-worldly. Join Debbie as she takes you through the steps of constructing a home for your own best-seller. Debbie’s newest book, Ready, Set, Goal!, is number 17 in The Mermaid Tales series.

Deborah Halverson
The Ultimate Checklist for Submitting to Editors10 Tests a Novel Must Pass to Prove It’s Really Ready for Submission to Editors   Too often, YA/MG manuscripts are submitted to editors before they are truly ready. And since you only get one chance with a particular editor, you can’t risk sending out a manuscript that’s not the best it can be. But how can you know when your manuscript is really ready? You think it is, but how can you know for sure? Learn ten actionable tests for knowing when a novel is really, truly ready to submit… along with ways to whip the manuscript into shape if it fails a single one of them.

Deborah Shine
Writing for a multilingual audience:   What works and doesn’t work in picture book manuscripts that will be published in more than one language. Children should not only be able to see themselves in print but also hear their native tongue when the books are read aloud., so Star Bright makes bilingual books available in 24 languages, including Haitian Creole, Vietnamese, and simple Chinese.

Erica Silverman
Selecting the Right Agent for You

Nicki Carmack
Basic Content overview:   What is bleed? RGB or CMYK? How does the gutter impact my artwork? This session will discuss many of the basic rules of production that will ensure illustrations are reproduced in the way the artist intended.

Matt Ringler
Lots of Plots: From the Beginning to the End (and Everything in Between)

John Cusick
STAYING SANE   Writer’s block, imposter-syndrome, the inner critic, isolation! Learn practical techniques for embracing the writers life without going stir-crazy.

Linda Sue Park
Authenticity in Story   This session will examine the issue of authenticity, which applies to all writers. Can research and imagination substitute for lived experience? Who can write what stories? What makes a story authentic? These are difficult questions that are often painful to explore, but necessary for everyone in our field–and ultimately, for our young readers. Authenticity in Story.

3:00-3:45 Closing Remarks and Door Prizes

3:45-5:30 PM Critiques

Informal Critique Sessions – Cafeteria

Face to Face Critiques and Portfolio Reviews – Media Center

 

 

Sunday March 11, 2018 – Optional Activities
Location: Spain Park High School

One-On-One Sessions with Agents – all day as scheduled

John Cusick
Claire Easton
Kristy Hunter
Erica Silverman

 

Writers’ Intensives 9:00 AM-4:00 PM

Morning Sessions 9:00 AM – Noon

Linda Sue Park
Sentence Sense

In this hands-on workshop, we’ll examine techniques that will make every word count, both strengthening and polishing your story. Participants should bring at least thirty pages of a middle-grade or YA novel in progress, ON A LAPTOP. (The techniques we’ll be practicing are very difficult to do using paper and pen.)

Deborah Halverson
How to Talk Like a Teen When You’re So Not One: Writing Dialogue in YA/MG Fiction

Teen readers want to hear directly from the teen characters in their books. Your novel’s dialogue must entertain young readers, intrigue them, inform them, comfort them, and, depending on which characters are moving their lips, sound like them. In this session, learn techniques for crafting convincingly youthful dialogue as well as strategies for using dialogue as a powerful tool for exposing characters, stimulating them to action they wouldn’t otherwise take, and revealing plot information. The result: Flavorful, convincing conversations that’ll enrich the entire reading experience. Bring a laptop or writing utensil and paper for writing exercises.

Matt Ringler
Novel and Chapter Book Roundtable with Editor Matt Ringler, Scholastic Books

At this roundtable for middle grade and young adult novelists and hear how an editor responds to the first five pages of your chapter book, middle grade, or young adult manuscript (starting from the beginning, formated in 12 point font, double spaced, Times New Roman, with one inch margins). The first 15 to register and elect to share their manuscript will have their work read and critiqued. Even if you do not elect to have your work read, or don’t sign up early enough to snag one of the spots, you will hear live, on-the-spot feedback that will help you grow as a writer and understand what editors are focusing on in the first five pages.
NOTE: Format pages in 12 pt. font, Times New Roman, double spaced, one inch margins. All participants should bring 16 STAPLED copies of the first five pages of their work-in-progress chapter book, middle grade, or young adult novel. (one for Matt, one for you, and one for each participant = 16)

 

Lunch 12:00-1:00

 

Afternoon Sessions 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Kami Kinard & Rebecca Petruck
Building Characters with Heart and Humor

Middle Grade authors and critique partners Kami Kinard and Rebecca Petruck offer tips and techniques for bringing heart and humor to manuscripts in this intensive designed to help authors master the driving force behind every great book: character development. Learn how to use what you already have, your feelings and sense of humor, to create irresistible characters your readers will love. Expect a few tips on how to get the most out of a critique partnership along the way!

Jodi Wheeler Toppen & Heather Montgomery
Curiosity meets the printed page: writing science and nature for kids

Connect your readers to the marvels of the real world. In this intensive we will revel in research. We will explore transforming trivia into timeless truths and see how to move readers from abstract to “Aha!” Not just for nonfiction, this is a hands-on, pens-on workshop.

Janice Hardy
Bringing Your Novel to LIfe

Great novels blend skilled writing with compelling storytelling, using a multitude of techniques to draw readers in and make them love the book. These techniques work together to build immersive story worlds, creating characters readers love, settings they want to live in, and stories they can’t put down. In this workshop, you’ll learn techniques to bring your novel to life for your readers. Use point of view to show, not tell, and draw readers in without infodumping; find the best ways to describe the setting and build a world; tap into the emotions of the characters and use those emotions to drive the plot and deepen the story; and how all these techniques work together to build a novel. With hands-on exercises, you’ll practice these techniques in class, and then put them to work in your own novel. Bring your laptop or pages!

 

Illustrators’ Day  9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Deborah Shine: What a small press like Star Bright looks for when hiring an illustrator and how illustrations evolve from initial story board thumbnails to final copy.

Pat Cummings: Illustrators Matchbox: How to use dynamic elements (Scale, Perspective, Lighting, Pattern, Texture, etc.) to fire up the emotional impact of your work.

Lunch

Nicki Carmack: Tips and tricks for enhancing illustrations through production techniques: How embossing, foil stamping, lamination etc. can impact your artwork and create a more dynamic finished product.

Nicki Carmack: Mentorship presentation

Quickfire Portfolio Review.
Panelist: Deb Shine, Pat Cummings, Nicki Carmack and Claire Easton

Question and Answer Session