SCBWI

Society of
Children's Book Writers
and Illustrators

Linda Sue Park

LindaSuePark

Linda Sue Park is the author of several novels and picture books, including A SINGLE SHARD, the 2002 Newbery Medal winner, and the long-running New York Times bestseller A LONG WALK TO WATER. Her most recent titles are the Wing & Claw Trilogy (a middle-grade fantasy series) and YAKS YAK, a picture book. She is honored to serve on the Board of Advisors for SCBWI and WNDB. Linda Sue knows very well that she will never be able to read every great book ever written, but she keeps trying anyway.

Visit her website at www.lindasuepark.com and follow her on Twitter @LindaSuePark.

*photo credit: Sonya Sones

Linda Sue’s Books:LindaSueParkBooks

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KEYNOTE:
Yours Truly: why passion matters   What’s the secret to writing an irresistible manuscript? Linda Sue Park will talk about how true passion is the key to every question you might have about writing. From choice of subject matter to aspects of craft, bringing passion to your project is what will make it stand out for your readers–including that agent or editor.

INTENSIVE:
Sentence Sense   In this hands-on workshop, we’ll examine techniques that will make every word count, both strengthening and polishing your story. Participants should bring at least thirty pages of a middle-grade or YA novel in progress, ON A LAPTOP. (The techniques we’ll be practicing are very difficult to do using paper and pen.)

BREAKOUT:
Authenticity in Story   This session will examine the issue of authenticity, which applies to all writers. Can research and imagination substitute for lived experience? Who can write what stories? What makes a story authentic? These are difficult questions that are often painful to explore, but necessary for everyone in our field–and ultimately, for our young readers. Authenticity in Story

Scene: the building block of fiction   The scene is the basic unit of the novel. This session will provide an overview of how to use scene to develop and propel your story. Learn how thinking in scenes can be valuable at every stage: planning, writing, and revising.